After Seattle Riot, Armed Citizens Guard Small Town as Antis’ Exploit Try Fails Tuesday, June 2, 2020 17:49

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After Seattle Riot, Armed Citizens Guard Small Town as Antis’ Exploit Try Fails
Tuesday, June 2, 2020 17:49
https://beforeitsnews.com/survival/2020/06/after-seattle-riot-armed-citizens-guard-small-town-as-antis-exploit-try-fails-2755024.html

U.S.A. –-(AmmoLand.com)- When residents of Snohomish, Wash., reportedly heard rumors that the violence which erupted in Seattle over the weekend might spill into their community, several took up arms and gathered on the small town’s main street to guard local businesses from vandals, the Seattle Times reported.

Carrying sidearms and semi-auto rifles, they reportedly kept an eye on passing vehicles along First Street, underscoring a Facebook message (from Firearms Unknown in Riverside, CA) posted by Alan Gottlieb, chairman of the Citizen’s Committee for the Right to Keep and Bear Arms: “The answer to the question ‘why do you need an AR-15 and 30 round magazines?’ is on every news channel today.”

Posted by Alan M Gottlieb on Sunday, May 31, 2020

Likewise, at Pistol Annie’s pawn shop in Bonney Lake, south of Seattle, several armed citizens showed up to protect the store from the threat of looting, according to KIRO radio. Owner Melissa Denny, posted the following message on social media:

“UPDATE: I don’t know what’s worse, going through this or knowing my son is sitting at home worrying about me going through this. We are safe and the store is untouched. We’ve watched vehicle after vehicle go by with limo tint windows and many, many of the same ones over and over. I feel confident that the team of men and women who stood vigilant and will remain to do so as long as it’s necessary kept us safe tonight. I am beyond humbled and grateful for them all. There aren’t enough words. There aren’t enough thank you’s. Fighting for our 2A is certainly going to mean even more after this. Anyone who can come help stand with us would really help as it’s going to be a long few days. We desperately need a shift change.”

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At the other end of the spectrum, however, a wealthy Seattle gun prohibitionist’s attempt at sarcasm as the riot ensued in his city’s downtown area perhaps epitomized the anti-gun mindset to exploit every tragic event to further the gun control agenda.

But in his effort to attack gun owners, venture capitalist Nick Hanauer essentially put his foot in mouth.

Just another upstanding citizen exercising his god given right to open carry an AR15. What is the problem? https://t.co/ipwvpGj4qy

— Nick Hanauer (@NickHanauer) May 31, 2020

Reacting to an incident involving a demonstrator who was caught briefly on camera with an AR-15 rifle next to a vandalized Seattle Police cruiser before he was disarmed at gunpoint, Hanauer tweeted: “Just another upstanding citizen exercising his god-given right to open carry an AR15. What is the problem?”

His comment was in response to an earlier tweet from someone named Naveed Jamali, who posted an 18-second video clip of the incident that originally appeared live on KOMO News.

A KOMO camera focused on the incident from several yards away as the masked demonstrator, appearing to fumble with the rifle, was rushed by a bearded man who grabbed the gun, motioned the demonstrator away, and then cleared the weapon of its visibly loaded magazine. The armed citizen turned out to be a private security guard hired by KCPQ News, and the AR rifle had been taken from the patrol vehicle before the camera started filming.

The dramatic disarm — many viewers and even a KOMO anchor called it heroic — probably prevented someone from being injured.

Hanauer is a founder and one of the primary financial supporters of the Seattle-based Alliance for Gun Responsibility, the group behind a series of Evergreen State gun control initiatives that have affected law-abiding gun owners without visibly reducing violent crime in the state. According to the FBI Uniform Crime Reports for 2015-2018, the first year following passage of Initiative 594, a “universal background check” measure, there were 209 murders in Washington, including 141 involving firearms. The next year, that dropped to 195 slayings, including 127 with guns. In 2017, the state reported 228 homicides, including 134 involving firearms, and in 2018, there were 232 murders, of which 138 were committed with firearms.

Hanauer’s gratuitous tweet brought immediate and unflattering reactions.
One man responded, “Jesus Christ this has to be the worst take I’ve seen all night.”

Another declared, “You ID10T, he STOLE it out of the patrol vehicle he probably helped vandalize and had it taken from him by a member of a security detail. Remind me what restaurants you run, so I know which ones to avoid!”

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A third man observed, “This security guard was the hero, and you are the absolute zero. Thanks for coming out.”

And KTTH Radio’s Jason Rantz replied to Hanauer’s tweet: “You really are an imbecile.”

According to KCPQ reporter Brandi Kruse, who tweeted the morning after, “Our guard is former special forces. He is not a police officer. He acted on his own, after getting our crew to safety around a building.”

Thread:

I want to answer some questions about the AR-15 debacle here in one thread so I don’t have to try to answer them individually. And I will also say that @SeattlePD needs to answer for why these weapons were left in police cars in the middle of the riot zone.

— Brandi Kruse (@BrandiKruse) May 31, 2020

“We watched the first AR-15 be pulled from a cruiser, then ran along with many others as the protester fired it into the cruiser.”

The security guard apparently seized both police weapons from protesters and they were returned to Seattle police. There have been questions about why police left loaded patrol rifles in their vehicles.

Hanauer’s tweet was not the only head-scratcher in the aftermath of Seattle’s destructive riot. Liberal Democrat Mayor Jenny Durkan signed a Civil Emergency Order “establishing prohibited items.”

The order created a zone in downtown Seattle and declared, “Within this zone, all persons are prohibited from possessing, transporting, purchasing, furnishing or selling any weapon, including, but not limited to: rocks, bottles, pipes, bats, clubs, chains, sharpened signs, shields, gas, road flares, torches, paint balls, light bulbs, any incendiary devices, pry-bars, skateboards, balloons filled with liquid, dimensional lumber with a dimension greater than ½ inch, or any other objects which can be used for infliction of bodily harm or damage to property.”

Police are authorized to confiscate any weapon on the list, or “any other implement reasonably perceived or believed to be capable of being used as a weapon found” within the boundaries set forth in the proclamation.

Noticeable by their absence on the list are firearms. Seattle is located in King County, and at last report from the state Department of Licensing, there were more than 100,000 active concealed pistol licenses in that county, roughly one-fifth of all the CPLs in Washington state.

Yet, during a press conference, Mayor Durkan did mention firearms.

Seattle, like other major cities, suffered widespread vandalism and looting in reaction to the death of George Floyd after being held to the ground by a Minneapolis police officer after being handcuffed. The officer, who was subsequently fired along with three others, placed his knee on Lloyd’s neck for some eight minutes, even after Lloyd, a black man, said he couldn’t breathe. That former cop has been charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter, according to published reports.

Commenting on the riot—what else could it be called as vehicles burned and stores were trashed and looted—veteran KIRO radio broadcaster Dori Monson declared the violence was “a stunning failure of political leadership.”

He noted that in many cities, people tried to gather peacefully to protest Floyd’s death.

“But for days, in city after city,” Monson wrote at MyNorthwest.com, “we saw those peaceful protests get hijacked by rioting and looting that had zero to do with George Floyd — in fact, all the rioting did was dishonor Floyd’s memory.

About Dave WorkmanDave Workman

Dave Workman is a senior editor at TheGunMag.com and Liberty Park Press, author of multiple books on the Right to Keep & Bear Arms and formerly an NRA-certified firearms instructor.

The post After Seattle Riot, Armed Citizens Guard Small Town as Antis’ Exploit Try Fails appeared first on AmmoLand.com.

Source: https://www.ammoland.com/2020/06/after-seattle-riot-armed-citizens-guard-small-town-as-antis-exploit-try-fails/
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The Senate’s Plan To Save Small Businesses Is Already Failing, And Mnuchin Just Made It Worse

Steven-Mnuchin-Mike-Pence-and-the-Coronavirus-Taskforce-March-2020-White-House-D-Myles-Cullen-Flick
(Photo Ricky Harris/The White House/Flickr
Photo White House/D. Myles Cullen/Flickr.)

BUSINESS

The Senate’s Plan To Save Small Businesses Is Already Failing, And Mnuchin Just Made It Worse

The details are out of Treasury now, and it looks like it isn’t going to work for a large number of small business owners after all.
Christopher Bedford
https://thefederalist.com/2020/04/08/the-senates-plan-to-save-small-businesses-is-already-failing-and-mnuchin-just-made-it-worse/

By Christopher Bedford
APRIL 8, 2020

Remember the deal the president signed to save America’s small businesses from ruin during the government’s coronavirus shutdown? The one hammered out by the Senate and Secretary of the Treasury Steven Mnuchin over weeks of tense negotiation while Americans worriedly watched, hoping good news might come before a depression does? The details are out of Treasury now, and it looks like it isn’t going to work for a large number of small business owners after all.

It isn’t going to work because the Senate’s formula allows far too little money to make up for a lost month and get through the following two or more while meeting the Senate’s demands. The Senate made these demands to protect workers, but did not provide the money a lot of businesses will need to protect workers and themselves. It’s just common sense, Washington will say, to protect workers and the taxpayer in these hard times.

Then, even if there was enough money, it isn’t going to work because Mnuchin crafted loan parameters that make it untenable for nearly all small businesses should the Senate’s demands not be met, which would mean the loan doesn’t qualify for forgiveness. Treasury did this last bit to protect the banks while pushing them to make loans they aren’t otherwise making. It’s just common sense, he’ll say, because local and regional banks couldn’t make a more generous deal work — a problem Mnuchin knew was coming the entire time the Senate negotiated, of course.

Here’s how it all plays out in real life. Imagine you own a restaurant with a gross revenue of $1.2 million a year, or $100,000 a month. This business employs eight people and has gross expenses of $1 million a year, or $85,000 a month. So in a normal year for your restaurant, you get to take home $200,000, minus taxes. A 20 percent profit, by the way, puts you above and beyond a lot of America’s small businesses, which will be dealing with tighter margins than the ones below.

Your monthly expenses don’t include buying goods anymore, because the government shut you down for the pandemic, but they still include rent or interest on your mortgage, the real estate tax, building insurance, maintenance and utilities, coming to $15,000 a month in your case. Then you have, say, $30,000 a month in payroll before taxes, and none of this includes your own pay. Now you need a loan.

The Senate’s loan amount is generated by multiplying a business’s monthly payroll by 2.5. The loan is meant to cover two months and can go toward your costs and utilities, but to qualify for grant forgiveness you need to retain your entire workforce and put at least 75 percent of the loan toward them.

At 2.5 times your monthly payroll, which is $30,000, you’re looking at a $75,000 loan. If this seems less than your needs, it’s because it is. You’re already in the hole because you saw a steep decline in business in March as the pandemic spread, but you didn’t know what was coming so you kept your full staff without earning near full revenue. Now you’ve got $75,000 for the next two months, but two months of payroll, rent and utilities swings in at $90,000 — $15,000 more than the loan that already doesn’t take last month into account. The city closed your restaurant the next two months too, by the way, so you won’t be earning a dime of revenue in that time.

By June, you’ve earned no income and you’re halfway through your year. If you could get roaring again right away you might make up some of that, but you’re a restaurant and unless a cure is suddenly widely available, occupancy will be severely limited by the state and revenue won’t be what it once was. It might not be profitable to open at all, given new distancing requirements and their impact on sales.

If you don’t make the Senate’s requirements, you have to pay that loan back, and thanks to Mnuchin, you’re not going to be able to do that either. In the bill, Congress set a window of a maximum interest of 4 percent and loan repayment within 10 years. This was just a window, so it was up to Treasury to set the final costs and they put them at 1 percent interest and two years to pay the bank.

In real life, that means you’re looking at beginning your third quarter in debt, limping on into the winter, losing an entire year’s profits getting your business running again, and owing nearly half of next year’s profits to the bank, all before any other loans you had to take out to keep from bankruptcy. You might have been able to spread that pain out, but two years is too little time.

And then there’s all the dictates Nancy Pelosi put into the bill in exchange for the Democrat vote. You might support the speaker and think that paid leave and health insurance requirements on small businesses are a noble policy, but you’ve got a lot on your mind and in addition to keeping everything afloat, taking this loan means you expose yourself to a lot of business costs very quickly at the onset of what might be an economic depression. Republicans gave you a tax credit to pay for it all, which is nice, but that’s at the end of the year — if you’re broke and out of business by then, it won’t mean anything.

Additionally, as your neighbors’ restaurants go under, the cost of the goods you need have increased. It’s a disaster. There’s no chance you’re making $200,000 in profits this year. Instead, with the private loans you finally pried out of the near-frozen banks, you’re in debt and left wondering what you’re doing here. The business you’ve worked for all these years just went down in a sea of shutdowns and disease, and there are jobs that pay well without all the risk and danger of being an entrepreneur and employing people in your community.

Like most other small business owners, you never wanted to own a giant company or a big house on the hill — just earn a good living working hard. It’s a sad thing, but the reality is most Americans prefer stability and assurances to risk and exposure, even with the chance of reward. That’s what makes our entrepreneurs different and what makes them special: They take the risk, and because they do, a whole lot of the rest of us have jobs, favorite places to go, sponsors for our children’s sports teams, and all the other things that make a town our town.

The above scenario is just one, and some folks might have lower or higher costs than your restaurant did, but you’re united with them in that risk you took to make America a better place for yourselves and your neighbors. Now that might be over, ended by a foreign disease, politicians who don’t get what it takes to run a business, and a Treasury secretary who only cares about Wall Street and the banks. It’s a terrible thing to see. Let’s pray Washington wises up — and hold them accountable if they don’t.

Christopher Bedford is a senior editor at The Federalist, the vice chairman of Young Americans for Freedom, a board member at the National Journalism Center, and the author of The Art of the Donald. Follow him on Twitter.
Photo Ricky Harris/The White House/Flickr
Photo White House/D. Myles Cullen/Flickr.

Walmarts across the country also closed on Monday for plumbing repairs


http://www.khou.com/story/news/local/2015/04/14/livingston-walmart-one-of-five-across-country-to-close-on-the-same-day/25748473/
Marcelino Benito, KHOU 11 News 12:21 a.m. CDT April 14, 2015

KHOU 11 News has confirmed, along with the Walmart in Livingston, Texas, four other Walmarts across the country also closed on Monday for plumbing repairs.

The stores are located in Brandon, FL, Midland, TX, Tulsa, OK, and at an undisclosed location in California.

The Livingston store’s closing is the talk of the town off Highway 59 in Livingston, Texas. Hundreds of locals packed into Walmart just hours before it closed.

“It was chaotic, the line was from the front all the way to the produce,” said customer Pam Underferth. “It was crazy.”

The company calls it a temporary closure to perform extensive repairs to the store. For now there’s no date to reopen. The store is expected to be closed for at least six months.

“They’re the ones who dropped the bomb on us,” said one former employee.

More than 400 store associates found out around 1 p.m. on Monday their jobs at this location were being eliminated.

“She was crying and upset,” said Betty Suarez.

Suarez’s daughter-in-law called her to let her know what was happening.

“She has three kids, what is she going to do,” said Suarez.

Walmart tells us there are no layoffs. The employees apparently are “eligible to transfer to other stores if a suitable opening exists.” The only problem is the closest store is 30 miles away.

“We’re going to have to drive to Lufkin, or Cleveland or Huntsville,” said Underferth.

Before we were asked to leave Walmart’s property employees told KHOU they are getting two months pay. Some employees may also be eligible for severance. They say they were all told a new position isn’t guaranteed.

“Everybody was really emotional, because some people have been working there for 25 years,” said another former employee.

It’s rattled customers and employees in this small town alike. People that rely on this store everyday.

“We’re thinking what’s it going to do to our economy,” said Suarez. “We don’t have K-Mart, we don’t have Target. Walmart is it.”

Below is a complete statement from a Walmart spokeswoman:

“As part of an effort to ensure all of our stores are fully serving the needs of our customers we regularly assess the conditions of our stores. Due to ongoing plumbing issues that will require extensive repairs we are temporarily closing the Livingston store. We will immediately begin the process to address these issues and intend to reopen the store as soon as all of the plumbing issues are resolved. Deciding to close a store is not a decision we make lightly, but after careful consideration, we felt it was necessary to make these repairs so we can better serve our customers and the community in the long run.”

If you were impacted by this temporary closure, Walmart will host informational sessions for associates with questions on April 16 and 17th at Camp Cho-Yeh in Livingston. Contact Walmart for more information.